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Great Backyard Bird Count 2014

Watching a Carolina Chickadee, Sandy Manter, TN, 2013 GBBC

What is the GBBC?

The 2014 GBBC will take place Friday, February 14, through Monday, February 17. Please join us for the 17th annual count!

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where the birds are.

GBBC checklists can be accepted from anywhere in the world!

Everyone is welcome–from beginning bird watchers to experts. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy—and it helps the birds.

Participants tally the number of individual birds of each species they see during their count period. They enter these numbers on the GBBC website.

New participants must set up a free GBBC account to submit their checklists or use login information from an existing account for any other Cornell Lab citizen-science project. You’ll only need to do this once to participate in all future GBBC events. Click “Submit Your Bird Checklist” at the top of this page or see How to Participate for more details.

I counted the birds in my yard today for the Great Backyard Bird Count. The temperature was 48 degrees F at 9:45 am when I started observing and counting.

Today I saw an Allen’s Hummingbird. This species of hummingbird is found along the California coast during its breeding sesason and during the summer. While I see Anna’s Hummingbirds nearly everyday, seeing an Allen’s Humming bird is a rare occurance. I was excited to see another species during my count.

Record ID: S9945945
Observation Date : FEB 20, 2012
Start Time: 9:45 AM
Total Birding Time: 30 minutes
Party Size: 1
Skill: excellent
Weather: excellent
Snow Depth: No snow was present

Nearby Habitat(s):
deciduous woods
coniferous woods
grassland
suburban

Number of Species: 16
All Reported: yes

Checklist:
Turkey Vulture – 1
Mourning Dove – 4
Anna’s Hummingbird – 1
Allen’s Hummingbird – 1
Steller’s Jay – 1
Western Scrub-Jay – 2
Chestnut-backed Chickadee – 1
Oak Titmouse – 1
White-breasted Nuthatch – 1
California Towhee – 2
White-crowned Sparrow – 1
Golden-crowned Sparrow – 5
Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon) – 4
House Finch – 6
Lesser Goldfinch – 2
American Goldfinch – 1

I counted the birds in my yard this morning for 45 minutes for the Great Backyard Bird Count. The sun was shining and the temperature was 53 degrees F when I started counting. Here is the list of birds I submitted to GBBC.

Observation Date: FEB 18, 2012
Start Time: 10:00 AM
Snow Depth: No snow was present
Total Birding Time: 45 minutes
Location Type: Yard
Party Size: 1
Skill: good
Weather: excellent

Nearby Habitat(s):
deciduous woods
coniferous woods
grassland
suburban

Number of species: 14
All Reported: yes

Species Count

Mourning Dove 8
Anna’s Hummingbird 2
Steller’s Jay 1
Western Scrub-Jay 4
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 2
Oak Titmouse 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
American Robin 1
California Towhee 1
White-crowned Sparrow 2
Golden-crowned Sparrow 6
Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon) 8
House Finch 19
Lesser Goldfinch 3

I counted birds in my yard this afternoon for 15 minutes for the Great Backyard Bird Count.

Start Time:  4:15 PM Snow Depth: No snow was present
Total Birding Time: 15 minutes Location Type: Yard
Party Size: 1Skill: goodWeather: excellent Habitat(s): deciduous woods coniferous woods suburban
Number of species: 12 All Reported: yes
Species Count
Mourning Dove 6
Anna’s Hummingbird 1
Western Scrub-Jay 1
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1
Oak Titmouse 1
California Towhee 1
White-crowned Sparrow 3
Golden-crowned Sparrow 2
Dark-eyed Junco 9
House Finch 10
Lesser Goldfinch 1
American Goldfinch 2

The 2012 GBBC will take place Friday, February 17, through Monday, February 20. Please join us for the 15th annual count!

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where the birds are across the continent. Anyone can participate, from beginning bird watchers to experts. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy—and it helps the birds.

Participants count birds anywhere for as little or as long as they wish during the four-day period. They tally the highest number of birds of each species seen together at any one time. To report their counts, they fill out an online checklist at the Great Backyard Bird Count website.

As the count progresses, anyone with Internet access can explore what is being reported from their own towns or anywhere in the United States and Canada. They can also see how this year’s numbers compare with those from previous years. Participants may also send in photographs of the birds they see. A selection of images is posted in the online photo gallery.

Scientists and bird enthusiasts can learn a lot by knowing where the birds are. Bird populations are dynamic; they are constantly in flux. No single scientist or team of scientists could hope to document the complex distribution and movements of so many species in such a short time.

Scientists need your help. Make sure the birds from your community are well represented in the count. It doesn’t matter whether you report the 5 species coming to your backyard feeder or the 75 species you see during a day’s outing to a wildlife refuge.

Kids watch and count birds in your yard, a nearby park, or maybe at your school. Report what you saw by entering your bird list online.

By doing this, we learn what kind of birds are being seen in the winter and whether there are more or fewer of them than before. Learn more about how to participate.

You’ll have more fun if you learn more about birds.

Great Backyard Bird Count For Kids

Make sure your local birds are represented in the upcoming Great Backyard Bird Count. The 15th annual GBBC takes place February 17-20. Everything you need to know to participate is on the website at www.birdcount.org, including downloadable instructions, FAQs, and a how-to video. Get a regional list of the birds you might see in your area in February so you can brush up on your identification skills ahead of time.

Statistics from 2011
Total Checklists Submitted: 92,218

Total Species Observed: 594

Total Individual Birds Counted: 11,471,949

The Great Backyard Bird Count for 2011 is over. Volunteers from all over the US and Canada are adding their bird count checklists to the online data.

Statistics for 2011 so far 

Total Checklists Submitted: 91,915
Total Species Observed: 596
Total Individual Birds Counted: 11,452,925

These two videos show citizen scientists involved with the bird count. Anyone with an interest in the bird species where they live can participate. All you need is a pair of binoculars and a bird guide to help you identify the birds in your area.

Next Year’s GBBC is scheduled for Feb. 17-20, 2012

Voice of America Great Backyard Bird Count Video

YNN-TV Announcing Great Backyard Bird count

Record ID: S7721832
(You will need to refer to this number if you wish to correspond about your data.)
Locality: 94506, Danville, Contra Costa County, CA
Observation Date: FEB 20, 2011 Email: randall.whitney@prodigy.net
Start Time: 10:00 AM Snow Depth: No snow was present
Total Birding Time: 30 minutes Location Type: Yard
Party Size: 1Skill: goodWeather: excellent Habitat(s):
deciduous woods
coniferous woods
suburban
Number of species: 14 All Reported: yes
Species Count
Mourning Dove 3
Western Screech-Owl 2
Anna’s Hummingbird 1
Steller’s Jay 1
Western Scrub-Jay 3
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 3
Oak Titmouse 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Spotted Towhee 1
California Towhee 2
White-crowned Sparrow 2
Golden-crowned Sparrow 4
Dark-eyed Junco 3
House Finch 1

The bird count has begun!

The 14th annual Great Backyard Bird Count takes place across the United States and Canada this weekend. Are you going to participate?

The count is from February 18th through the 21st. It’s organized by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the National Audubon Society and Bird Studies Canada.

You don’t have to be an expert to count the birds. Anyone can participate! Plus when you enter your data online, you have a chance to win prizes like birdfeeders, binoculars, books and more.

You can count birds anywhere, not just your backyard. Many birdwatchers count birds at National Parks, nature centers and even schools.

All you need to do is count birds for a minimum of 15 minutes on one or more days during the event.  Of course you can count longer if you want too. You can even count at different locations. You record the highest number of birds for a particular species you see at any one time. If your not sure of a particular species, it’s okay. You don’t have to report that one. Once your done, you enter the data online on the Great Backyard Bird Count website.

To make counting easier, you can download a list of the birds that you might see in your area. Visit the GBBC’s printable tally sheet webpage and enter your zip code, town or park to get your list!

Scientists use the data gathered to help document bird distributions and movements. You can also explore the data from previous counts on the GBBC website. Check out the maps or see the top 10 list of birds for your area.

For more information, visit the Great Backyard Bird Count website.

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